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Sponge Bob

Page history last edited by AKabodian 10 years, 9 months ago

Read my Personal Narrative --- Don't Throw Stones or You'll Regret It

 

 

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Your Wiki Page

Your Wiki Page

Sponge bob's fun page

My COOL MYTH

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My Persuasive Essay

 

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The Width of the World

Amelia and her sister were adventurous.  During the summer, Amelia had a fantastic idea.  She found some lumber from in the barn and propped the two-by-fours against the toolshed roof.  Amelia was building a rollercoaster.  Friends stopped by and some stayed to help.  They sawed and hammered the track.  One end of the track was nailed to the shed.  For the roller coaster car, they fastened roller-skates to the bottom of a crate.  Finally, they oiled the skate wheels and greased the track.  Amelia climbed up onto the roof of the shed and got into the car.  She barely had time to yell “Whee!!” before the wheels hit the grass and the car flipped over.  Amelia lay on the grass for a moment, with the wind knocked out of her.  Then she began to laugh.  “Wasn’t that grand?” she exclaimed.  Clearly Amelia Earhart—who would grow up to be a pioneer female aviator—had an early love of speed.

            Amelia Earhart was born in 1897 in Atchison, Kansas.  Growing up in the Midwest, most young girls were encouraged to participate in quiet activities.  But Amelia Earhart was encouraged to be just the opposite.  The blonde little girl was adventurous and very physically active.  Amelia’s favorite things to do were horseback riding, playing rough games, and being outdoors.  She had never even considered flying, though, until 1920.

            Amelia’s father, Edwin Earhart, was an alcoholic who had trouble keeping a job and supporting his family.  Because of this, the Earhart family moved a lot, living in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and California.  Witnessing the effect of her parents’ unhappy marriage on her mother’s health and financial status had a lasting impact on Amelia.  She became determined to remain independent and in control of her own life.

            While living in New York in 1919, the 22-year-old Amelia enrolled at Columbia University as a pre-med student.  She did very well her first year of college, but family responsibilities drew her to California the next year.  Here she took her first plane ride, and immediately knew that flying was for her.  Amelia abandoned college and signed up for flying lessons from a pioneer woman pilot, Neta Snook.  Soon after, in 1921, Amelia took her first solo flight, and for her 25th birthday, she bought her first plane.

            Because flying was still relatively new, the 1920’s were an era of air shows and flying stunts.  Participating in these air shows helped Amelia to become well known to the people of the world.  Before long, George Putnam, a publicist who managed Lindbergh’s flight across the Atlantic, had heard about the talented Amelia Earhart.  Putnam was eager to manage an event similar to Lindbergh’s. In 1928, Putnam chose Amelia to be the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean.  Although Amelia was only a passenger, she caught the attention of the public and was crowned “First Lady of the Air.”  Amelia Earhart and George Putnam became fast friends and in 1931, they were married.  Under Putnam’s guidance, Amelia earned a lot of money through product endorsements and lectures, which she continued throughout her life.

            In 1932, tall, attractive, and confident Amelia Earhart flew 2,026 miles across the Atlantic.  She also set two transcontinental records flying solo from Hawaii to California, California to Mexico City, and Mexico City to New Jersey.  A few years later, Amelia and her navigator set a goal to make a flight around the world—a feat never before achieved.  On June 1st, 1937, they flew off from Oakland, California in the direction of the Atlantic Ocean.  “The whole width of the world has passed behind us,” Earhart reported, “except this broad ocean. I shall be glad when we have the hazards of its navigation behind us.”  But before they had even reached their first destination, radio communications became weak and distorted.  The coastguard could barely make out that they were reporting a low fuel tank.  Communications were lost and never recovered. Earhart’s plane met with the same fate.  Her plane is presumed to have crashed into the ocean, though no wreck has been found.  A pilot, navigator, and an entire plane have simply just… disappeared. 

 

 

 MY MYTH

This is your individual wiki page for 7th grade English.  You can delete some or all of these words after you read them and make this page look the way you want it to look.  (You'll still be able to see them on the Template page under the Folders for each hour)

You will, of course, be graded on your wiki at several points this school year.  Your wiki will be graded on the following criteria:

  • that you make your page uniquely yours (25%)

    • this means that you change the font & colors, as well as add other features along the way
  • that you use your time well when we have computer time (25%)

    • this means that you don't talk too much and/or be distracted by your friends when you have time to work
    • this also means that you try your hardest and do your best
  • that you meet the requirements for each individual assignment (50%)

    • these requirements will be explained on each assignment's handout sheet

 

Here are some other things to keep in mind: 

  • you and your parents signed a form saying you will you this wiki responsibly
    • please do not put others down or use profanity (or upload any songs/videos that use profanity)
  • part of the fun of wikis, and websites in general, is that you can create links to other websites
    • if you include something about Yellowstone National Park in your writing, you can create a link to it
      • find the web address for Yellowstone National Park and copy it (right click, Copy)
      • highlight the word you want to be the link (Yellowstone, for example)
      • on this page (in Edit mode), click on the globe above that says "Insert/Edit Link" if you scroll over it
      • under "Link type" choose URL
      • paste the Yellowstone address in the lower box and click OK
      • click on Save in the lower left corner and then see if it worked
  • here are a couple tips when changing the background color
    • for some reason, pbwiki's editing program doesn't seem to allow a whole page background change (if you figure it out, let me know).  So, you may have to fill in the section in which you want to change the color; you can do this by using the Tab key on your keyboard.  Tab through the area, then highlight it.  Then go up to the Background Color tab (above, left) and change the color to one you like
    • make sure you choose a color isn't too dark; the font color (black, for example) needs to be able to be read over your background color (brown background would make a black font hard to read).
  • here are a couple tips regarding font choice
    • please stay somewhat consistent with your font choice; it's easier to read than... if it changes too often
    • try to make the font size of titles a bit larger; you can use the Format area above and choose a Heading
  • keep your wiki page organized
    • feel free to add a page that's linked to your page if you want
    • if you add photos, include brief captions about what's going on or who is in the photos or why the photo is on your wiki (no last names, please)
    • you can make folders on the Side Bar area; maybe a folder for each of your other three Core areas (Social Studies, Science, and Math) and/or a Hobbies Folder

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -

 

The Width of the World

Amelia and her sister were adventurous.  During the summer, Amelia had a fantastic idea.  She found some lumber from in the barn and propped the two-by-fours against the toolshed roof.  Amelia was building a rollercoaster.  Friends stopped by and some stayed to help.  They sawed and hammered the track.  One end of the track was nailed to the shed.  For the roller coaster car, they fastened roller-skates to the bottom of a crate.  Finally, they oiled the skate wheels and greased the track.  Amelia climbed up onto the roof of the shed and got into the car.  She barely had time to yell “Whee!!” before the wheels hit the grass and the car flipped over.  Amelia lay on the grass for a moment, with the wind knocked out of her.  Then she began to laugh.  “Wasn’t that grand?” she exclaimed.  Clearly Amelia Earhart—who would grow up to be a pioneer female aviator—had an early love of speed.

            Amelia Earhart was born in 1897 in Atchison, Kansas.  Growing up in the Midwest, most young girls were encouraged to participate in quiet activities.  But Amelia Earhart was encouraged to be just the opposite.  The blonde little girl was adventurous and very physically active.  Amelia’s favorite things to do were horseback riding, playing rough games, and being outdoors.  She had never even considered flying, though, until 1920.

            Amelia’s father, Edwin Earhart, was an alcoholic who had trouble keeping a job and supporting his family.  Because of this, the Earhart family moved a lot, living in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and California.  Witnessing the effect of her parents’ unhappy marriage on her mother’s health and financial status had a lasting impact on Amelia.  She became determined to remain independent and in control of her own life.

            While living in New York in 1919, the 22-year-old Amelia enrolled at Columbia University as a pre-med student.  She did very well her first year of college, but family responsibilities drew her to California the next year.  Here she took her first plane ride, and immediately knew that flying was for her.  Amelia abandoned college and signed up for flying lessons from a pioneer woman pilot, Neta Snook.  Soon after, in 1921, Amelia took her first solo flight, and for her 25th birthday, she bought her first plane.

            Because flying was still relatively new, the 1920’s were an era of air shows and flying stunts.  Participating in these air shows helped Amelia to become well known to the people of the world.  Before long, George Putnam, a publicist who managed Lindbergh’s flight across the Atlantic, had heard about the talented Amelia Earhart.  Putnam was eager to manage an event similar to Lindbergh’s. In 1928, Putnam chose Amelia to be the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean.  Although Amelia was only a passenger, she caught the attention of the public and was crowned “First Lady of the Air.”  Amelia Earhart and George Putnam became fast friends and in 1931, they were married.  Under Putnam’s guidance, Amelia earned a lot of money through product endorsements and lectures, which she continued throughout her life.

            In 1932, tall, attractive, and confident Amelia Earhart flew 2,026 miles across the Atlantic.  She also set two transcontinental records flying solo from Hawaii to California, California to Mexico City, and Mexico City to New Jersey.  A few years later, Amelia and her navigator set a goal to make a flight around the world—a feat never before achieved.  On June 1st, 1937, they flew off from Oakland, California in the direction of the Atlantic Ocean.  “The whole width of the world has passed behind us,” Earhart reported, “except this broad ocean. I shall be glad when we have the hazards of its navigation behind us.”  But before they had even reached their first destination, radio communications became weak and distorted.  The coastguard could barely make out that they were reporting a low fuel tank.  Communications were lost and never recovered. Earhart’s plane met with the same fate.  Her plane is presumed to have crashed into the ocean, though no wreck has been found.  A pilot, navigator, and an entire plane have simply just… disappeared. 

 

 

 

 

My Myth

 

Walk Two Moons and me:   On a Road Trip across the United States

 

In the novel, Sal and her grandparents stop at many national landmarks.  One that I learned about was 

A few things I learned about were

I found this photo of it at   (web address)

 

My Myth Page

I found this photo at http://www.dannyburk.com/images/old-faithful.jpg


Get a Voki now!

If I could travel anywhere in the United States, I would go to

I would travel there because

I found this photo of             at    (web address)  

 

You have my permission to use my words (above) and just complete the sentences and add photos.  If you want to write your own version, please include all the information above.   

 

 

The Width of the World

Amelia and her sister were adventurous.  During the summer, Amelia had a fantastic idea.  She found some lumber from in the barn and propped the two-by-fours against the toolshed roof.  Amelia was building a rollercoaster.  Friends stopped by and some stayed to help.  They sawed and hammered the track.  One end of the track was nailed to the shed.  For the roller coaster car, they fastened roller-skates to the bottom of a crate.  Finally, they oiled the skate wheels and greased the track.  Amelia climbed up onto the roof of the shed and got into the car.  She barely had time to yell “Whee!!” before the wheels hit the grass and the car flipped over.  Amelia lay on the grass for a moment, with the wind knocked out of her.  Then she began to laugh.  “Wasn’t that grand?” she exclaimed.  Clearly Amelia Earhart—who would grow up to be a pioneer female aviator—had an early love of speed.

            Amelia Earhart was born in 1897 in Atchison, Kansas.  Growing up in the Midwest, most young girls were encouraged to participate in quiet activities.  But Amelia Earhart was encouraged to be just the opposite.  The blonde little girl was adventurous and very physically active.  Amelia’s favorite things to do were horseback riding, playing rough games, and being outdoors.  She had never even considered flying, though, until 1920.

            Amelia’s father, Edwin Earhart, was an alcoholic who had trouble keeping a job and supporting his family.  Because of this, the Earhart family moved a lot, living in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and California.  Witnessing the effect of her parents’ unhappy marriage on her mother’s health and financial status had a lasting impact on Amelia.  She became determined to remain independent and in control of her own life.

            While living in New York in 1919, the 22-year-old Amelia enrolled at Columbia University as a pre-med student.  She did very well her first year of college, but family responsibilities drew her to California the next year.  Here she took her first plane ride, and immediately knew that flying was for her.  Amelia abandoned college and signed up for flying lessons from a pioneer woman pilot, Neta Snook.  Soon after, in 1921, Amelia took her first solo flight, and for her 25th birthday, she bought her first plane.

            Because flying was still relatively new, the 1920’s were an era of air shows and flying stunts.  Participating in these air shows helped Amelia to become well known to the people of the world.  Before long, George Putnam, a publicist who managed Lindbergh’s flight across the Atlantic, had heard about the talented Amelia Earhart.  Putnam was eager to manage an event similar to Lindbergh’s. In 1928, Putnam chose Amelia to be the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean.  Although Amelia was only a passenger, she caught the attention of the public and was crowned “First Lady of the Air.”  Amelia Earhart and George Putnam became fast friends and in 1931, they were married.  Under Putnam’s guidance, Amelia earned a lot of money through product endorsements and lectures, which she continued throughout her life.

            In 1932, tall, attractive, and confident Amelia Earhart flew 2,026 miles across the Atlantic.  She also set two transcontinental records flying solo from Hawaii to California, California to Mexico City, and Mexico City to New Jersey.  A few years later, Amelia and her navigator set a goal to make a flight around the world—a feat never before achieved.  On June 1st, 1937, they flew off from Oakland, California in the direction of the Atlantic Ocean.  “The whole width of the world has passed behind us,” Earhart reported, “except this broad ocean. I shall be glad when we have the hazards of its navigation behind us.”  But before they had even reached their first destination, radio communications became weak and distorted.  The coastguard could barely make out that they were reporting a low fuel tank.  Communications were lost and never recovered. Earhart’s plane met with the same fate.  Her plane is presumed to have crashed into the ocean, though no wreck has been found.  A pilot, navigator, and an entire plane have simply just… disappeared. 

 

  

 

Comments (4)

Reichenbach, Sterling said

at 7:42 pm on Sep 30, 2008

like it!

Mims, Victoria said

at 9:43 am on Oct 5, 2008

I liki it!!

danielb said

at 8:29 am on Feb 11, 2015

what?

zacharya said

at 8:29 am on Feb 12, 2015

Double What?

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