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Tommy

Page history last edited by morgan310 11 years ago

Welcome to Tommy Morgan's Wiki!

     

     Welcome! I like to play soccer,work in my yard, run, and learn about plants. My  favorite plants are Ligularia and Hydrangea (the list could keep going). When I grow up I want to be a landsape architect, which is basicaly someone that designs outdoor plantings and landscapes. Make sure to check my Wiki oftenly for my current writing news. 

 

 

Final Reflection

By: Tommy Morgan

 

 

I enjoyed the challenge and success that this year’s English class brought. I felt that this year there was not a very strict rubric to follow on my writing assignments, which allowed me to be more creative and express my true feelings. My favorite writing assignment was the research paper. It allowed me to be creative and factual at the same time, which turned out to be pretty interesting. We did not work with others very much this half of the year. I enjoyed that; working by myself allows me to stay focused and not to become distracted.

In my reflection I did earlier, I stated strong feelings about how I liked goggle docs. My opinions have changed though. This half of the year, I have not been using goggle docs very much, because it seems like it has been acting slow. In fact, I have gone back to the traditional flash drive. This half of the year I have not gotten very much feedback on my writing from my peers. This has taught me to edit my writing more independently. I still like the wiki, but I get the feeling that not very many people are viewing the wiki. I think in future years, you should try to advertise the wiki more to the school and the public.

            One thing that bothered me was that length was part of the grading rubric on poems. I believe that someone should be able to express his or her feelings freely in a poem without having to worry about the length. I feel that this whole year in English, the concept I had the hardest time grasping was the parts of a sentence. There are so many parts and rules, that they’re hard to remember. Even though some people called my binder messy this year, I had an easy time keeping track of my assignments and turning them in on time. I did not like using my planner this past year, I found it easy to remember my assignments and there due dates.

With the knowledge I have acquired this year, I feel very prepared for eighth grade.

The Venus Flytrap Experiment

(science fiction story)

By: Tommy Morgan

 

 

 

The day felt routine at the Michigan State Horticultural department. Clifford started his morning in the green house, watering the helluborus’s and opening the air vents. He whistled as he worked, thinking about the common names and Latin names for plants. Clifford was a well-respected student at the horticultural department. His latest project involved genetically altering a venus flytrap. He finished his watering duties and started to make his way toward his project. As he walked, professors stopped to ask how the project was going. Clifford politely responded by saying, “ok.” That was not the truth though: the truth was it was going great!

            The goal of Clifford’s project was to expand the varieties of nutrition a venus flytrap could digest, beyond flies. If this goal could be met, it would revolutionize the way unwanted pests could be dealt with. Instead of mouse traps there could be venus mousetraps. Instead of squirrel traps there could be venus squirrel traps. The possibilities were endless.

            Clifford walked into room 322. Grow lights shined down on rows of venus flytraps. He looked down at each young seedling like a proud father. The whole horticultural department was depending on Clifford to succeed with his project and draw attention to the university.

            Once the seedlings were established, Clifford would start feeding them mosquitoes and flies on a daily basis. After the plants became accustomed to this schedule, Clifford would not feed them for a couple of days: starving them. Following this, he would then introduce a new food such as hummingbirds and immature mice. His thinking was that if this procedure was repeated, the plants might become accustomed to many types of food. He had been given a great deal of grant money to prove this, and he wanted to make sure the project succeeded.

            It was a couple weeks later when it became time to introduce a new type of food to the plants: live, baby mice. It felt strange to Clifford to feed a squirming furry creature to a plant, but exciting too. The mouse’s pulse was normal, not used to a plant being a predator. Clifford slowly lowered the mouse into the plants open “jaw.” As Clifford held his breath nervously, the venus flytrap closed down onto the mouse, capturing it. Clifford was amazed at this scientific break-through, and all of the potential it possessed.

            Clifford had spent months isolating the gene that restricted the plant’s growth. It appeared as though he had been successful not only in isolating it, but in removing it. Clearly, the plant was growing more than a typical venus flytrap would. Soon he would try feeding them squirrels. The plants absorbed squirrels as easily as fertilizer.

            One day Clifford was feeding a rabbit to a plant. As he was dropping the rabbit into the “jaws” of the plant, he accidenly brushed a trigger hair located on the trap lobe. This caused the plant to close abruptly onto Clifford’s hand, trapping it. At this point of time, the venus flytrap’s stem was about as thick as a small sapling’s trunk, making it impossible for Clifford to remove his hand from the plant without a tool. He yelled and called for help as the plant’s lobes slowly clamped down onto Clifford’s wrist. A professor finally heard his plea and rushed into the room. Without hesitating the professor grabbed a pair of loppers and cut off the plant’s lobes.

            Clifford and his professors began to realize that the plants were becoming too dangerous for human use. After consulting with the university, Clifford decided that it would be best if the plants were demolished. The greenhouse staff reported the next day with chain saws to cut down the venus flytraps. Clifford was glad that the plants would not harm anybody, but sad that his plants could not be used to help the world.

            Nobody considered that the plants might have produced seedpods. Nobody even paid much attention when the greenhouse misters turned on automatically, moistening what might be there, waiting to grow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Characters In The Giver Should Be Able To Make Choices

By: Tommy Morgan

 

The characters in The Giver do not get the opportunity to make choices and because of this, their lives are less satisfying and less meaningful.

If someone in The Giver was to get a career chosen for them that they did not want, they would spend their whole lives working in a job that was not truly meant for them. Individuals in this book do not get the chance to choose their spouses. The selection of a spouse is one of the most important decisions you make in your life. Not getting the chance to choose your own spouse could result in having to spend time with someone for your whole life who you do not care for.

    Another important decision that people in The Giver  are not allowed to participate in is release (death). How one dies, or how one chooses to die, is a highly private issue. Government officials should not control death of another individual. Death is or ought to be a natural process. Like choosing a spouse, there is much emotion attached. Humans in The Giver do not get to choose the meals they eat. Food can bring satisfaction to life. Without getting to choose their food, characters miss out on a considerable source of pleasure.

    Because individuals in The Giver are not given opportunities to chose a career, protect their own lives, choose a spouse, or select the food they eat, their lives are less satisfying and meaningful.

 

 

 

William J. Beal

By: Tommy Morgan

 

 

 

If you looked at the rankings of horticulture schools in the country, you would find Michigan State University at the top. What many people don’t know is how the school got to the top, and who helped get the school to this elite position. The answer is William J Beal. Professor William J Beal contributed greatly to make MSU a nationally recognized horticulture school.

William J. Beal was born March 11th 1833 in Adrian, Michigan to William and Rachel Cosmick Beal. He became interested in botany, and took many classes on the subject from teachers such as Louis Agassiz at Harvard University, who he would look up to for the rest of his life. Beal attended the University of Michigan, where he earned two degrees. His studies continued at Harvard University. He finished up school at Chicago University where he got an M.S. degree in 1875. Later in his life Beal would receive many honorary degrees for his work and accomplishments.

Williams’s passion for botany and natural science continued throughout his whole life. He believed that every elementary school in the United States should have their own science museum. Beal’s passion for botany was so strong that he continued teaching botany, even though he got a salary less than $2,200 a year. He founded and participated in many societies for the natural environment, such as The Society of the Promotion of Agriculture and the Michigan State Forestry Commission. Beal even constructed a laboratory for botany on the MSU campus. This would be the first laboratory fully devoted to botany in the United States.

    Beal spent most of his science career at Michigan State University, where he taught botany from 1871-1910. Throughout his time there, he would add many contributions to the Michigan State campus. One of Beal’s most well known contributions is Beal Garden. Beal Garden, originally called the Wild Garden, is a garden Beal constructed for his students to use for research. Today, Beal Gardens houses over 5,000 species of plants and is not only enjoyed by scientists but also the general public. William also established many small arboretums scattered throughout the Michigan State campus. Some of these arboretums can still be seen today. Beal also established a seed germination experiment at MSU. For this experiment William filled 20 bottles, each bottle containing 50 seeds from 21 different kinds of plants. Every five years a different bottle is opened. The goal of the experiment is to see which seeds germinate the fastest. This experiment Beal started is still going today and brings national attention to Michigan State. The last bottle is due to be dug up in 2020.

            The effort and work Beal contributed to Michigan State horticulture is still appreciated today. In 2001, Beal Gardens was voted most romantic spot in the greater Lansing Peoples Choice Competition. In 1963, The Michigan Horticulture Society recognized Beal gardens as the outstanding campus botanical garden of the country. In 1955, the American Society of Horticulture Science proclaimed Beal Gardens as the finest teaching facility in the country. As Bruce Mccristal once said about the MSU campus,  “The careful observance and maintenance of our campus’s plants, has continued

 

since the time Beal started.”

            William J. Beal was responsible for establishing a level of excellence in horticultural research that continues today. His commitment to providing great education and sharing garden spaces with the public helped build a reputation for Michigan State University. That reputation has continued to grow and MSU remains a leading institute for botanical research.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Works Cited

 

Baker, Ray and Jessie B. Baker: An American Pioneer in science William James Beal. Amherst, Massachusetts: privately Printed

 

Beard, James and Peter O. Cookingham. “William J. Beal: Pioneer Applied Botanical Scientist And Research society Builder.” Agronomy Journal. 5 Jan 2007 < https://www.agronomy.org>

 

“Letter Featured in Darwin Day Programs.” Archives @ MSU. 2 March 2009

<http://msuarchives.wordpress.com>

The Beal Legacy.” Archives @ MSU. 7 July 2012 < http://msuarchives.wordpress

 

“Time Line History Of Garden.” W.J. Beal Botanical Garden. < http://www.cpa.msu.edu>

 

“William James Beal.” Wikipedia. 7 May 2013 < http://en.wikipedia.org>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hera’s Wish

Tommy Morgan

 

One day, Hera, wife of Zeus, was wandering along Mt. Olympus, looking without much interest at the rocks and sand that lay in her path.  She wished the world had more color, life, and texture.  She wished for something that would sway in the wind or dazzle her eyes.  As Hera walked, she thought about what her wish was.  It would have to be alive, but not walk or talk.  It would have to act mysteriously.  Her wish could not be one thing: there would have to be many varieties of it.  Hera thought about her wish for many days and nights.  Finally, she mustered up enough courage to tell her husband her wish.

 

“Oh Mighty Zeus,” Hera said.  “I need something to brighten up my life.”

 

“What my darling could you ever want?” Zeus responded.  “We have all the gold and wealth you could ever want,” he said.

 

Hera told Zeus her general requirements, but could not name anything specifically.  Hera told him this for five years, but was never able to articulate what her exact wish was.  In the sixth of asking, she could not bear waiting for this wish any longer.  She went up to the highest peak of Mt. Olympus and jumped, landing, crumbled and dead, in a mound of rock and loam.  Zeus regretted that he had not paid attention to Hera’s desires more carefully.  He took the list of this wife’s wishes and from it made something he hoped would have pleased her.  He made something that was alive, and which was colorful and joyful, but it was something that also died back, as his wife had.  He called his wife’s wish a “plant” and made it sprout from Hera’s unbeating heart.  His wife wanted many varieties of her wish, but the first plant Zeus created he named carpathian harebell, after his wife.

 

 

 

 

The Secret Of Terror Castle

Book Written By: Robert Arthur

This Review By: Tommy Morgan

 

 

     Pete, Bob, and Jupiter, the main characters have started their own detective service. Their first case involves Alfred Hitchcock, a Hollywood movie director who is looking for a haunted house for one of his movies. After meeting at the detectives’ junkyard headquarters, the search is on for the best haunted house in all of California.  With the help of a Rolls Royce (won by Jupiter in a contest), a chauffer driver, and plenty of haunts and scares along the way, The Three Question Marks Detective Service will help Alfred Hitchcock find something above and beyond his expectations.

     I thought that The Secret Of Terror Castle was a great book. The book’s 179 pages went by quickly...too quickly, because I didn’t want it to end. The plot was suspenseful, full of mysteries and questions. In one instance, Jupiter finds a secret door disguised as a mirror.  The door leads to a secret staircase, and the staircase leads to more adventure. Jupiter often left me wondering how he knew answers to certain problems. He was a thoughtful character with great intelligence.

     While searching for a haunted house, The Three Question Marks Detective Service confronts many different kinds of haunts. Some of these haunts create terror, and some allow the three detectives to demonstrate a great cool under pressure. Throughout the book, there is a sense that the three boys will continue to encounter danger and excitement.

     The author did a great job of telling a story about a group of ordinary boys with big ambitions. I would strongly recommend this book to anyone that likes mysteries and good writing. I myself am excited to read the sequels in this appealing series. 

 

 

Fliqz has shut down their service. To access this video, email support with this video id: 4ab2da723a5e40a19050e2200cc0919b

 

 

 

 

 

 

- - - - - - - - -A picture of Frederick Law Olmstead, a landscape architect I admire - - - - - - - -- -

 

  

Tommy
2nd Hour
English - Mr. Kabodian

PADDLEBOARDING


    The  nose of the paddleboard cut through the waves of the dark water, leaving a trail of small white bubbles that looked as though they were carbonated. I was at my grandparents’ cottage, located on a small inland lake near Grayling, Michigan. We had just gotten a stand-up paddleboard (SUP) to add to our fleet of non-motorized boats, and I was trying it out.
    An SUP is basically like a surfboard that you stand on and paddle, using a paddle similar to a canoe paddle, but with a longer shaft and a bent blade. It was a cold day, unusual for that summer. The wind was strong and it blew me down the lake. It was going to be hard to get back. The splash of the paddle in the water was drowned out by the waves lapping up on the side of the board.

A family of small turtles swam in front of me. When they saw the dark shadow of the board loom over them, they moved into their shells for safety and dove into deeper water. I could hardly see them against the murky seaweed at the bottom of the lake. I moved on to shallow water. As I paddled, I came upon something that looked like a black pit at the bottom of the lake. I watched carefully and saw that the “pit” moved. I paddled closer, and to my astonishment I saw that the “pit” was the biggest snapping turtle I had ever seen. Standing on the board, there were only three feet of water between us. It was an odd feeling to float over the turtle. I was fascinated, but also cautious, and I moved away, not wanting to lose any fingers or toes. A light mist was falling, and it was even cooler than when I had started. The wind pushed against me as I

Tommy Morgan - Page 2

paddled to the cottage. I had to put as much force as I could muster into the paddle to make any progress.

When I reached the dock of our cottage, I tied the paddleboard up and trotted toward the glowing windows of the porch. The warmth of the woodstove greeted me when I came in, and I could smell what was left from our dinner. I was glad to be inside. Sometimes you don’t realize how cozy a place is until you have gotten outside of it and felt something wild.

 

THE RISKS OF PLANTING INVASIVE SPECIES

By Tommy Morgan

 

I strongly believe that humans should not plant invasive species. Invasive plants are plants introduced into an environment that have the tendency to spread quickly. If we do not plant invasive species, ecosystems will be more balanced, there will be more varieties of plants, and, lastly, our environments will be more interesting because of biological diversity.

    First, if  we do not plant invasive species our ecosystems will have a better chance of being balanced environments. An invasive plant can take over very quickly and in some cases eliminate other plant species. After an invasive plant is introduced into an area, it can spread rapidly and be hard to get under control.
    Secondly, avoiding the introduction of invasive species will make sure that there are many varieties of plants. An invasive plant can cover an entire area in only a matter of years. Take garlic mustard for example, found originally in northeastern Europe. The plant was originally introduced in 1868 as a source of erosion control, food, and medicine, but is now one of the most common invasive species in Michigan and many other states in the U.S.
    Lastly, by not planting invasive species, gardeners can make sure that areas stay diverse. Have you ever looked at a natural space, only to see it obscured with one type of ground cover? Such a landscape can be rather boring. As humans, we tend to prefer natural spaces with interesting colors, concepts, and plant variety. It’s even nice to see different textures in a garden space. Animals need diversity too. Different animals feed on different plants for nutritional and practical reasons. A diverse landscape ensures that animals and humans are satisfied. Invasive species tend to take over entire areas, choking out other growth.
    Humans should not plant invasive species. Invasive plants endanger the health of our environment. By not planting them, we can ensure our ecosystems are balanced, diverse, and interesting. Before introducing an invasive plant, think about the effects it might have on the environment!
    
 

    Cottage

 

Our car jostled and bumped up the gravel and dirt road. I could hear the sound of laughter echoing across the lake and the smell of pine needles wafting through the window. I peered out of the front window of the car, hoping to see the first glimpse of my grandparents grey cottage.

    When we got to the cottage I looked in the garage at kayak's and canoes #waiting to be used. As I was admiring the watercraft, my grandpa came out to greet us with his usual smile plastered on his face. I took my bag and lugged it into the cottage. It was the same as always with windows open and my grandma making culinary masterpieces in the kitchen. I looked into the wood paneled living room where the radio was playing soft calming music. I took my bags into my room and examined the quilt that my grandmother had made.

The sun was setting, so I walked down to the dock and watched fish feed on mayflies on the calm water. The water that I would explore the next day.   

 

Tommy Morgan

2nd Hour

 

A FOREST’S DAY

 

 

Flowers blow in the wind,

passing messages as they touch,

their blossoms brushing

against each other gently.

Moss lends a carpeted trail

for the forest’s small

but mighty creatures.

Rivers are precious shipping channels

for beavers’ cargoes of log.

Trees stand like grandparents

watching over their saplings.

Stones watch this quietly,

wondering if someday

they will blow or blossom

or walk a carpeted trail;

if someday they will

float logs on their backs

or stand watching

pebbles grow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Tommy Morgan

2nd Hour

 

 

HAPPY

 

 Brown bundle of fur,

tail wagging

like a spinning top,

mouth curled up

as though even he

knows how to smile.

 

 

I BELIEVE IN PLANTS

By Tommy Morgan

2nd Hour

 

 

     In my home state of Michigan, it is November. The colorful pots of marigolds and geraniums that lined my neighbors’ front steps all summer are gone. People are moving on to green wreathes and Christmas lights. But I am still focused on foliage and bright flowers. Even though our impatiens have shriveled from frost, I am already planning next year’s garden.

     I believe in the power of plants. I believe that plants add color to our lives even after they have stopped blooming. I believe that plants teach us about life, success, and defeat.  All plants start from a tiny seed. They grow bigger or sometimes die. Sometimes, between growing and dying, they suffer. Sometimes they bloom. Generally, they suffer and they bloom: just like people. Last summer, a Lenten Rose in our front yard was trampled. Its entire stem – every part of it that we could see – was gone. We were ready to plant another one, but a few weeks later, I noticed a bright green stem was sprouting from its rootstock.

     Plants teach us life skills. Because they give us something to tend and anticipate, they teach us to hope. They teach us to stick with something even if the process is long and difficult, because sometimes plants take a long time to grow. They teach us to believe that cold spells won’t always kill us. Plants add beauty to our world where we most need it: next to concrete or parking lots, and inside funeral homes and hospitals. Plants are natural art. Some are symmetrical, some have patterns, some have flowers, and some have variegated foliage. They are all unique.   

     Plants help us appreciate life cycles, and can make our own lives easier to understand.  There is a reason we send plants or flowers to people when they are sad or sick. Plants help us feel better. They connect us to what is real. They even help clean the air we breathe. Plants take out carbon dioxide from the air and replace it with oxygen, which is another way of saying that plants keep us alive. When I walk in a greenhouse, I am overwhelmed with happiness and peace because of all of the life around me. It’s a different kind of life than my own: it’s silent and green, but it adds texture and excitement to mine.  Yes, it’s November, but I’m already dreaming of next year’s garden. I believe in plants.

 

 

 

 

TOMMY MORGAN’S REFLECTIONS

 

 

After reflecting on all of the writing assignments I have completed in this past semester, I think that writing a poem was the most challenging for me. I think I wasn’t used to describing something creatively in detail.

         Peer feedback was not helpful because I felt that my classmates’ comments were not genuine. My favorite writing assignment was the “This I Believe Essay.” I liked that it gave me a chance to think deeply about something that I care about.

         The Descriptive Essay did not represent my best work. It was the very beginning of the year and I was still getting used to writing again after a summer without much practice.

         I enjoyed writing a piece about a fun experience I had over the summer for my Personal Essay. It gave me an opportunity to think about a very special rainy day, and by writing about it I think I will remember it better forever.

         It was very important to me to convey my point in the Persuasive Essay. This assignment gave me a chance to inform other people about an important issue to me.

         I was surprised by the Public Service Announcement. I know that what we study in English is used in all different ways for all different reasons, but I wish we didn’t have to make a computer video.

          This year was the first year I was introduced to goggle docs. I felt that it was an easy piece of technology to navigate. I appreciate the fact that goggle docs saves automatically and that when I log in I can see all of the work I have accomplished.

         Learning new poetry terms this semester has given me the chance to translate those terms into my own poetry writing. At the beginning of the year our class went over fragment and run-on sentences. It had been a while since I had learned about them, and it was a helpful topic to review.

         I enjoyed using the wiki because it was fun to know that other people were enjoying my writing. The vokis seemed to be over used and became a distraction rather than being enjoyable. I am excited to see what the second semester brings.

        

         

The Venus Flytrap Experiment

(science fiction story)

By: Tommy Morgan

 

 

 

The day felt routine at the Michigan State Horticultural department. Clifford started his morning in the green house, watering the helluborus’s and opening the air vents. He whistled as he worked, thinking about the common names and Latin names for plants. Clifford was a well-respected student at the horticultural department. His latest project involved genetically altering a venus flytrap. He finished his watering duties and started to make his way toward his project. As he walked, professors stopped to ask how the project was going. Clifford politely responded by saying, “ok.” That was not the truth though: the truth was it was going great!

            The goal of Clifford’s project was to expand the varieties of nutrition a venus flytrap could digest, beyond flies. If this goal could be met, it would revolutionize the way unwanted pests could be dealt with. Instead of mouse traps there could be venus mousetraps. Instead of squirrel traps there could be venus squirrel traps. The possibilities were endless.

            Clifford walked into room 322. Grow lights shined down on rows of venus flytraps. He looked down at each young seedling like a proud father. The whole horticultural department was depending on Clifford to succeed with his project and draw attention to the university.

            Once the seedlings were established, Clifford would start feeding them mosquitoes and flies on a daily basis. After the plants became accustomed to this schedule, Clifford would not feed them for a couple of days: starving them. Following this, he would then introduce a new food such as hummingbirds and immature mice. His thinking was that if this procedure was repeated, the plants might become accustomed to many types of food. He had been given a great deal of grant money to prove this, and he wanted to make sure the project succeeded.

            It was a couple weeks later when it became time to introduce a new type of food to the plants: live, baby mice. It felt strange to Clifford to feed a squirming furry creature to a plant, but exciting too. The mouse’s pulse was normal, not used to a plant being a predator. Clifford slowly lowered the mouse into the plants open “jaw.” As Clifford held his breath nervously, the venus flytrap closed down onto the mouse, capturing it. Clifford was amazed at this scientific break-through, and all of the potential it possessed.

            Clifford had spent months isolating the gene that restricted the plant’s growth. It appeared as though he had been successful not only in isolating it, but in removing it. Clearly, the plant was growing more than a typical venus flytrap would. Soon he would try feeding them squirrels. The plants absorbed squirrels as easily as fertilizer.

            One day Clifford was feeding a rabbit to a plant. As he was dropping the rabbit into the “jaws” of the plant, he accidenly brushed a trigger hair located on the trap lobe. This caused the plant to close abruptly onto Clifford’s hand, trapping it. At this point of time, the venus flytrap’s stem was about as thick as a small sapling’s trunk, making it impossible for Clifford to remove his hand from the plant without a tool. He yelled and called for help as the plant’s lobes slowly clamped down onto Clifford’s wrist. A professor finally heard his plea and rushed into the room. Without hesitating the professor grabbed a pair of loppers and cut off the plant’s lobes.

            Clifford and his professors began to realize that the plants were becoming too dangerous for human use. After consulting with the university, Clifford decided that it would be best if the plants were demolished. The greenhouse staff reported the next day with chain saws to cut down the venus flytraps. Clifford was glad that the plants would not harm anybody, but sad that his plants could not be used to help the world.

            Nobody considered that the plants might have produced seedpods. Nobody even paid much attention when the greenhouse misters turned on automatically, moistening what might be there, waiting to grow.

 

 

 


  

 
   

 

 

Comments (3)

kalandar428 said

at 8:58 am on Sep 21, 2012

nice wiki! tommy. the robot is awesome!

cruse369 said

at 7:00 pm on Jan 8, 2013

i love your this i beleve story!

AKabodian said

at 7:40 pm on Jun 6, 2013

Thanks for the feedback you gave in your Final Reflection. It will help me improve the job I do and is a great example of the honesty and confidence in your writing voice.

You don't have permission to comment on this page.